Travel Photo Thursday

Travel Photo Thursday: Apr. 24/14: UNESCO World Heritage Site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

Posted by on Apr 24, 2014 in Canada, Destinations, Featured, Nova Scotia, Travel Photo Thursday | 23 comments

Welcome to the 174th week of Travel Photo Thursday. It’s midterm week, and that means that the semester is officially half over. I’m always amazed at how time flies. This week I’m taking you back to Nova Scotia for a virtual tour of  historical Grand Pre.

 

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

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In 2012 Nova Scotians were thrilled to learn that the historic village of Grand Pre had been awarded a World UNESCO designation. Less than a two hour drive from Halifax, it’s a perfect day trip. I visited in 2012 and again 2013. Enjoy the photo essay I created from those two visits.

 

We began our visit at the modern interpretive center, which provides visitors with a detailed history of the Acadians and their 1755 expulsion.

 

UNESCO Site : Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

 

UNESCO Site : Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

 

Inside you will learn the history of the Acadians and why they were ultimately expelled from Acadie; later to become Nova Scotia. 

The Acadians ended up in many of the New England States, and as far away as Louisiana. 

 

UNESCO site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

 Acadian farmer at work. The Acadian farms were built on dykes, and you’ll also learn all about how these dykes were constructed.

 

UNESCO site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

The  Great Expulsion, or  Le Grande Derangement began on August 11th, 1755. 

 

UNESCO Site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

Be sure to watch the 20 minute film before leaving the visitor’s center. The movie is an historically accurate 3D portrayal of why the Acadians were expelled, and the dramatic events leading up to their expulsion not only from Nova Scotia, but Canada. 

The Coles Note version of why the Acadians were expelled is that although they signed an oath of allegiance to the British Crown in 1730, they refused to fight pick up arms against the French, or the native Indians. By 1755 this refusal to bear arms was no longer acceptable to the British, and the expulsion began. Between 1755 and 1763, more than 10,000 Acadians were deported. Here’s a detailed history and timeline.

 

A short walk from the visitors center brings you to the statue of Evangaline and the memorial church. Along the way you’ll pass these bronze sculptures titled “Deportation”.

 

UNESCO site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

Most of this history was “forgotten” until Henry Longsworth Longfellow published his epic poem “Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie”, in 1847. The poem is a story of the expulsion of the Acadians from Acadie, and is one of loss and devotion. The poem sealed Longfellow’s fate as the most famous writer in America. Set primarily in Nova Scotia, and Louisiana the poem has had a significant cultural impact on these regions.  You can read Evangeline in its entirety

 

The world famous statue of  Longfellow’s Evangaline…

 

UNESCO Site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

The Memorial Church of Grand Pre is a tribute to the men who were held prisoner while they waited for the deportation ships to arrive. 

 

UNESCO Site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

Beautiful stained glass in the church…

 

Stained Glass Window, Chapel, Grand-Pré, Nova ScotiaPhoto Credit: Charles Hoffman via Flickr.com

 

Dykes were built to hold back the waters of the Minas Basin, and these farms  are still in operation today. You can watch the men working using traditional methods from long ago. Somehow I don’t think they farm with equipment from the 1700s everyday!

 

Harvesting the Hay in Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

Dyked Farm Land at Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

Acadian Day celebrations 2013…

 

Acadian Day Celebrations, 2013 -- Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

I had no idea that the Acadian Day celebrations were happening on the day that I visited in 2013. I was able to score a delicious lunch of traditional
Rappie Pie (or Rapure). In French, “rapure” means grated, and the main ingredient is grated potatoes. If you ever have the opportunity to try this pie, don’t miss out. It really is fabulous. I was able to buy a half portion for about three bucks!

 

Rappie Pie (Grand Pre, Nova Scotia)

 

 

If you want to try your hand at making rappie pie, check this out

 

Travelers Tip

Hours of operation for the 2014 season…

May 16th - June 28th

Tuesday – Saturday: 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday and Monday: closed
* Exception : Sunday May 18th and Monday May 19th

June 29th - September 2nd

Open daily: 9 pm - 5 pm

September 3rd - October 13th

Tuesday – Saturday: 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday and Monday: closed
* Exception : Sunday October 12th and Monday October 13th

Entrance Fees

Daily (May to October)

Adult $ 7.80
Senior $ 6.55
Youth $ 3.90
Family/Group $ 19.60
“Commercial Group, per person $ 6.55
“School Groups, per student $ 2.90
“School Groups, Entry and a Heritage Presentation Special Program, per student $ 3.90

Seasonal (May to October)

Adult $ 19.60
Senior $ 16.60
Youth $ 9.80
Family/Group $ 49.00

 

How to get there

From Halifax take Highway 101 to Exit 10 towards Wolfville. Follow Route 1 in a westerly direction for one kilometer, then turn right (head north) for another kilometer on the Grand-Pré Road. The drive is under 2 hours, and there is great signage.

On site

Give yourself a couple of hours to see everything. There’s lots of free parking right at the Visitor’s Center. It does get busy on the weekend, so you may find yourself in the overflow parking, a short walk down the road.

 

Grand Pre National Historic Site of Canada

 

Have you ever visited Grand Pre? Were you lucky enough to score some delicious rappie pie?

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This is the 174th edition of Travel Photo Thursday. You can browse the archives here.
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Travel Photo Thursday — Apr. 17/14 — Chiang Mai’s Buddhist Culture

Posted by on Apr 17, 2014 in Destinations, Thailand - Chiang Mai, Travel Photo Thursday | 41 comments

Welcome to the 173rd week of Travel Photo Thursday. The semester is half over, and this week I am preparing my 200+ students for their midterm exams next week. I have no idea where the weeks have gone, and I am sure that the rest of the semester will pass in the same whirlwind fashion. This week I’m bringing you back to Chiang Mai and a sampling of the many photos I have taken in and around the city’s numerous Buddhist temples. Did you know that Chiang Mai boasts more than 300 temples?

 

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hash tag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

As a courtesy please post a link to Budget Travelers Sandbox.

 

A statue at the base of the stupa at Wat Lok Molee. The white strings you see are used in numerous ceremonies such as holiday prayers and house blessings. The belief is that the strings transfer the blessings to each of  the participants. After the ceremony they will be cut into small pieces, and attached to visitors wrists to bring good luck. 

 

Buddhist Statue at Wat Lok Molee

 

 

Buddhist blessing string waiting to be hung…

 

Buddhist Blessing String

 

 

Buddhist water libation vessels used in blessings…

 

Buddhist Water Libation Vessels

 

 

Monk bowls at Wat Phan Tao…

 

Monk Bowls at Wat Phan Tao

 

Monks praying at Wat Chedi Luang on ordination day…

 

Monks Praying at Wat Chedi Luang

 

 

Temple bell at Wat Phan Tao…

 

Temple Bell at Wat Phan Tao

 

 

Lighting the candles on Macha Bukha Day at Wat Phan Tao…

Macha Bukha Day celebrates the day when 1,250 monks spontaneously came together to pay homage to the historical Buddha. 

 

Lighting the Candles on Macha Bukha Day

 

Preparing to honor the Buddha on Macha Bukha Day at Wat Phan Tao…

 

Makha Bukha Day, Wat Phan Tao

 

 

Travelers Tip 

The monks are very welcoming, and entrance to all of Chiang Mai’s temples is free. However, you will  come across numerous donation boxes throughout the temple complexes. To give or not to give is your choice. Temples are usually open from sunrise. Many close at 6pm. However, some of the bigger temples, like Wat Chedi Luang, usually stay open into the evening. Do dress appropriately. Women should cover their shoulders and knees. Men must wear shirts. Shoes must be removed before entering. 

The date of Macha Bucha day is based on the lunar calendar, usually in January or February. If you want to experience this celebration, be sure to check the date well in advance. 

 

 

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This is the 173rd edition of Travel Photo Thursday. You can browse the archives here.
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Travel Photo Thursday — Apr. 10/14 — Flower Blossom Time in Korea

Posted by on Apr 10, 2014 in Destinations, Featured, Korea, Travel Photo Thursday | 79 comments

Welcome to our 172nd week of Travel Photo Thursday. Last week I told you that spring had arrived in Korea. Well, Mother Nature is being fickle. This week the temperatures have taken a dive in the morning and evening. Of course, the afternoons are toasty warm, so impossible to know what to wear on the morning commute to work. However, that hasn’t stopped the cherry blossoms and magnolias from gracing us with their beauty. I wandered with my camera last weekend, and got some nice shots for Travel Photo Thursday.

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hash tag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

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Along the river…

 

Cherry Blossoms in Korea 2014

 

The deep pink blossoms are not that common in Daejeon…

 

In the Pink

Looking gorgeous against the blue sky…

Blossoms Overhead

Blossom whimsy…

Blossom Whimsy

 

 

Cherry Blossom Magic in Korea

 

Cherry Blossoms in the Wind

 

Many of the blossoms were starting to fall…

 

Blossoms on the Path

 

Cherry blossoms are not the only blossoms spreading their beauty in Korea. There’s the magnolia, which peaks before the cherry blossoms…

 

Magnolia in Daejeon

 

Lilacs, my favorite, are not that common in Korea. However, I saw quite a few small trees on Saturday. Give it a couple more years and the smell lilac will be wafting through the spring air.

 

Lilacs in Daejeon

 

 

And, the city will soon be blanketed in azalea’s, my all time favorite! 

 

The First Azela Blossoms of Spring

Travelers Tip

You’re probably wondering, when is the best time to see the cherryy blossoms in Korea? Well, that used to be very easy to predict. However, like most of the world, Korea’s weather has changed. This year we started seeing blossoms in mid March, and news sources say that they peaked last Saturday, April 6th (a full week earlier than usual, or so the Korean Herald tells us.)

I would say, (to be on the safe side), that you should be here by the last week in March. Of course, you can always start googling for predictions next February! :)

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This is the 172nd edition of Travel Photo Thursday. You can browse the archives here.
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Travel Photo Thursday — April 3rd/14 — Halifax’s Titanic Connection

Posted by on Apr 3, 2014 in Canada, Destinations, Featured, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Travel Photo Thursday | 37 comments

Welcome to our 171st week of Travel Photo Thursday. Spring has definitely arrived in Korea, and my plan is to get out and get some cherry blossom and magnolia shots before they are all but a beautiful memory. This a far cry from Halifax, where my poor Dad is still suffering through a particularly cold and nasty winter. This week I’m taking you back to Nova Scotia, and to Halifax’s Titanic connection.

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

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Halifax’s role in the aftermath of the sinking of the Titanic is a sad one. Three ships from the city were involved in the grim task of recovering victims from the cold, bleak North Atlantic. Over 100 of the bodies plucked from the sea found there way to Halifax, and are buried in three of the city’s cemeteries. Fairview Lawn Cemetary is the final resting place for one hundred and twenty-one of the Titanic’s casualties; more than any other cemetery in the world.

 

Titantic Grave Site, Fairview Lawn Cemetary

 

 

Most of those buried here are memorialized with small, grey granite markers etched with a name and April 15, 1912; the date the Titanic sank.

 

Titantic Victim - Paulson

 

Of course, not every victim was identified. Nearly a third of  the  headstones contain only the date and a number unique to each body.

 

Unnamed Titantic Grave.jpg

 

Thankfully, not all of the victims remained unidentified,  and some of these families did erect larger headstones in remembrance of their loved ones.

Titanic Victim, Alma Paulson

 

 

Remember Jack Dawson?

J Dawson, Titanic

 

When the movie was released in 1997 fans came to believe that this was indeed Jack Dawson’s final resting place. Movie goers showered the site with flowers and ticket stubs. Alas, dear Jack was not put to rest here. Researchers have discovered that this is the grave of Joseph Dawson, who was employed in the Titanic’s boiler room.

 

Titanic Gravesite

 

One of the better known grave markers, it was erected in honor of “The Unknown Child”, whose body was never claimed. His burial was paid for by sailors from the cable ship that recovered his body from the disaster site, the CS MacKay-Bennett. In 2002 the child was identified as Eino Viljami Panula. However, additional forensic testing proved that identification incorrect, and the child has been identified as Sydney Leslie Goodwin. From England, his entire family perished in the Titanic sinking.

 

The UnKnown Child

 

Titanic Graves, Fairview Lawn Cemetary , Halifax, Nova Scotia

 

 

As you can see from the photos, the Titanic victims have not been forgotten. Fresh flowers, and other gifts are lovingly laid on the headstones. This was one of the most touching…
Remembering

 

Traveler’s Tip

The cemetery is open seven days a week. I would recommend visiting during daylight hours, when there isn’t a lot of snow on the ground. Admission is free, although believe it or not, when it became a popular tourist attraction there was a suggestion that the city starting charging an entrance fee. That suggestion was nipped in the bud!

 

The star marks the location.

The star marks the location.

 

You can also choose a guided tour.

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This is the 171st edition of Travel Photo Thursday. You can browse the archives here.
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Travel Photo Thursday — Mar.27/14–Chiang Rai’s White Temple

Posted by on Mar 27, 2014 in Chiang Rai, Destinations, Featured, Travel Photo Thursday | 36 comments

Welcome to the 170th edition of Travel Photo Thursday. I just posted my first spring flower shot to Facebook. The magnolia trees are starting to blossom here in Daejeon. Spring is on the loose…YIPEEE…!! On that note I am taking you to Chiang Rai’s famed White Temple, Wat Rong Khun.

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

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Billed as the most visited temple in Thailand, Wat Rong Khun (or The White Temple), a contemporary Buddhist and Hindu temple,  is the brain child of Thai artist Chalermchai Kositpipat, who started the temple complex in 1997. Work continues today, with no immediate signs of completion. We arrived  just before lunch, and believe me getting a shot without hordes of people in view was a feat! Notice that the pond in front is home to a large number of gorgeous koi. An added bonus are the awesome temple reflections.

White Temple, Chiang Rai, Thailand

 

To reach the main temple you traverse a bridge representing the cycle of rebirth with the pits of hell lurking below.  Hand begging to escape from hell…(a little disturbing, eh?)

 

Reaching Hands White Temple

 

I call these the “White Temple Gremlins”…

 

White Temple Gremlins

 

At the end of the bridge  you reach the Gate of Heaven, guarded by Death.

 

White Temple Statue

 

No photos inside the temple, but what you will see depicted on the walls will probably surprise you. You’ll be surrounded by a mural depicting a horrific ending to the end or the world. The mural includes such popular culture icons as Michael Jackson, the Matrix, Spiderman, and even the Twin Towers with billowing smoke. The first time I saw this mural I think I had to pick my jaw up from the floor on the way out! I was not at all prepared.

 

This beautiful Buddha statue restores the calm….

 

BudhaStatue.jpg

 

Posing with the Naga…

Posing with the Naga at the White Temple Exit.

 

Framed by the trees…

 

White Temple

 

There is also a gothic influence around the site…(A little strange don’t you think?)

 

Hanging Heads, White Temple

Gothic Influence, White Temple

 

You can roam around the workshop and discover what the artists are up to! That’s one big Ganesha!

 

Workshop at the White Templ

 

You can also wander through galleries displaying many of the artist’s paintings; all for sale/no photos You can also purchase postcards and prints.

Before you leave be sure to use what are probably the poshest washroom facilities in all of Thailand…

 

"The Facilities", White Temple

 

 Have you been to the White Temple? What did you think?

Travelers Tip

The White Temple is about a 3 hour drive north of Chiang Mai, 13km south of Chiang Rai. As far as getting there you have a lot of choices. You can take the public bus or a mini bus, or as I did, a day tour. If you go on you own, you’ll have to overnight in Chiang Rai. I opted for a day tour, which left Chiang Mai at 7:30 am and returned at 5:30pm. The cost was an affordable 1000 Baht ($30.ooUS) and that included lunch. We also visited another attraction, which will get its own post. A tour can be booked at any of the tour agencies in the old city. 

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This is the 170th edition of Travel Photo Thursday. You can browse the archives here.
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Travel Photo Thursday — Mar.19/14 — A Peggy’s Cove Legacy

Posted by on Mar 20, 2014 in Canada, Destinations, Featured, Nova Scotia, Travel Photo Thursday | 20 comments

Welcome to another week of Travel Photo Thursday (our 169th!). Spring seems to have sprung here in Daejeon, double digit temps for the past few days! Today I spotted some magnolia blossoms. We’ll have gorgeous flowers blanketing the city soon! This time of the year always has me thinking of home, and how we anticipate the coming of spring and summer after a long cold Nova Scotia winter. My shots today come from Peggy’s Cove, and a legacy left by painter and sculptor Andrew de Garthe.

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hash tag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

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 Most visitors come to Peggy’s Cove to see the famous lighthouse, and  walk on the rocks. With any luck, the Atlantic waves will be crashing. If you look to the right just shortly after turning onto the narrow windy village road leading to the lighthouse and the rocks, you will see a humongous piece of granite. That was deGarthe’s back yard. In the 1970s  he decided to carve a monument into that 100 foot outcropping to honor Nova Scotia fisherman and their families. He was able to finish approximately half of the sculpture before he died; 32 fishermen, their wives and children, St. Elmo with wings spread, and the legendary Peggy of Peggy’s Cove.

His plan on paper….

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While De Garthe’s passing did bring an end to his ambitious endeavor  what he did complete is impressive, and people flock to see his stone monument with its intricate detail and the raw emotion he conveyed.

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He captures their hard working lives so eloquently through their expressive faces, and strong bodies…

 

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St. Elmo, the patron saint of fisherman…

St. Elmos, the patron saint of fisherman

St. Elmos, the patron saint of fisherman

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Traveler’s Tip

The area is accessible all year round, and there is no charge to view the monument, or the lighthouse. His former home is an art gallery. However, when I was there last summer, it was closed. Sadly, it looked to be abandoned. 

Peggy’s Cove is a quick 40 minute drive from Halifax. Although you may find yourself stopping along the way to take photos of the gorgeous ocean views. Check out this website for directions and other useful information…Peggy’s Cove Coastal Region.

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This is the 169th edition of Travel Photo Thursday. You can browse the archives here.
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