Wanderfood Wednesday — Andong Jimdak

Posted by on Apr 14, 2010 in Korea Sandbox | 28 comments

Here we are for another week of Wanderfood Wednesday kindly hosted by Wanderlust and Lipstick.

I love surprises, and I was more than pleasantly surprised when I found a cooking class in Seoul that was cooking up one of my all time Korean favorites, Andong Jimdak or Spicy Soy Sauce Chicken. The town of Andong, located about 5 hours down the peninsula, is famous for this savory dish. I lived in Andong my first year in Koren, and have fond memories of eating many platefuls of this flavorful comfort food.

Dan Gray of Seoul Eats and Chef Shawn are the personalities behind this cooking school adventure. I met Dan and the other attendees at a subway stop close to Itaewon, the foreigners section of Seoul. From there we strolled to a local traditional market where Dan gave us the rundown on some of the ingredients we would be using in our cooking class. From there we proceeded to Dan’s apartment where Chef Shawn was waiting to begin our cooking demonstration.

First, was a Spring Vegetable Salad (Geotjeori) made from seasonal vegetables that most of us had never heard of. Harvested from the forest, they are only available at traditional markets for a short time each spring. Thankfully, the delicious dressing can be added to any vegetables to create a sumptuous salad.

Next, of course, the main dish Andong Jimdak (Spicy Soy Sauce Chicken). The dish is not difficult to make, but there is lots of cutting and chopping involved, so it does take a bit of time to prepare.

Here’s the recipe…..

200g potatoes
200g onion
200g carrot
100g cucumber
Dried spicy chili to taste (Gochukaru)
100g vermicelli noodle
20g garlic
50 g leek
salt and pepper to taste
2-3 chickens cut up
Sauce:
1 cup soy sauce
dried spicy chili
30g garlic
3 cups water
30g leeks
1/2 cup starch syrup (you can substitute 1/2c brown sugar)
10g ginger
1 tsp pepper

1. Soak noodle in cold water for 30 minutes (very important)
2. Clean the chicken and cut into small pieces
3. cut the vegetables into bite-sized pieces
4. mix all ingredients for sauce and simmer for 15 minutes
5. heat oil in a pan and add garlic and dried chili peppers
6. add chicken and sear until brown and then add potatoes and carrots
7. pour in the sauce. When sauce reduced to about half add onions, leeks and cucumber
8. lastly add noodle and finish with seasoning.

Voila!……………..You have a pot of Andok Jimdak that will make your mouth water!

Along with the salad and jimdak we learned to make Rolled Egg Omelet (Gyeran Mari). The trick to rolling the eggs without them breaking is patience. You have to wait until the eggs are firm before starting to roll them gently a little at a time.

Finally, for desert we were treated to fresh strawberries with whipped cream served on pound cake. A perfect way to end a perfect meal.

The food was fantastic, and just as important, Dan and Shawn were charming hosts. I cannot think of a better way to spend a Saturday afternoon in Seoul. If you live in Seoul or are planning a visit, and want to experience an afternoon of great company and cooking contact Dan over at Seoul Eats. Dan will be only too happy to let you know what they’re cooking up and when…..

This is a great tasting activity that will fit into any traveler’s budget.

28 Comments

  1. That looks incredible. Thank you for sharing it … and the recipe, too!

  2. That looks incredible. Thank you for sharing it … and the recipe, too!

  3. Cooking classes are a great way to immerse into another culture. One of my favorite parts of a trip to Tokyo was the cooking class my husband and I took. We were the only students, it was in the chef’s home, we struggled to communicate verbally, but laughed a lot and completely enjoyed the experience.

  4. Cooking classes are a great way to immerse into another culture. One of my favorite parts of a trip to Tokyo was the cooking class my husband and I took. We were the only students, it was in the chef’s home, we struggled to communicate verbally, but laughed a lot and completely enjoyed the experience.

  5. WHAT an incredible experience – and fantastic recipe! thank you!

  6. WHAT an incredible experience – and fantastic recipe! thank you!

  7. @Wanderluster……….Your welcome! If you make it, please come back and let me know how it turned out.

  8. @Wanderluster……….Your welcome! If you make it, please come back and let me know how it turned out.

  9. @Nicole………I’m with you there. We learn so much about another country’s culture through their food and the customs surrounding it.
    I’ve taken cooking classes in Bali and Thailand as well. Loved every minute of them. Thanks for dropping by!

  10. @jessiev………I’m glad you enjoyed the post Jessie. Thanks for your kind comment.

  11. @Nicole………I’m with you there. We learn so much about another country’s culture through their food and the customs surrounding it.
    I’ve taken cooking classes in Bali and Thailand as well. Loved every minute of them. Thanks for dropping by!

  12. @jessiev………I’m glad you enjoyed the post Jessie. Thanks for your kind comment.

  13. I had Korean food once… still remember well some very hot cabbage. I liked it and the other dishes I had at that time I have forgotten their names. In Portugal, there is no Korean restaurants at the moment. There was one but closed. It seemed to be not very suitable to the Portuguese taste… anyway, I enjoyed reading this blog and see the photos. Local cooking is part of the local culture… Good chance you have!

  14. I had Korean food once… still remember well some very hot cabbage. I liked it and the other dishes I had at that time I have forgotten their names. In Portugal, there is no Korean restaurants at the moment. There was one but closed. It seemed to be not very suitable to the Portuguese taste… anyway, I enjoyed reading this blog and see the photos. Local cooking is part of the local culture… Good chance you have!

  15. @Belita…….Thanks for dropping by. I never ate Korean food until I moved here. The cabbage you would have eaten was kimchi. This is the national Korean dish. Koreans eat Kimchi with everything. It’s popular in Japan too.

  16. @Belita…….Thanks for dropping by. I never ate Korean food until I moved here. The cabbage you would have eaten was kimchi. This is the national Korean dish. Koreans eat Kimchi with everything. It’s popular in Japan too.

  17. I have never had Korean food and it sounds wonderful! You’re right about the cooking class as a means to immerse in a culture. And the chicken recipe sounds worth trying (especially since my husband loves to chop :)

  18. I have never had Korean food and it sounds wonderful! You’re right about the cooking class as a means to immerse in a culture. And the chicken recipe sounds worth trying (especially since my husband loves to chop :)

  19. @Margo………Having a “chopper” will make all the difference in the world :) Let me know how it turns out.

  20. @Margo………Having a “chopper” will make all the difference in the world :) Let me know how it turns out.

  21. Thanks for writing this up.

    Dan

  22. Thanks for writing this up.

    Dan

  23. @Dan…………You’re very welcome.

  24. @Dan…………You’re very welcome.

  25. That andok jimdak looks super delicious. It’s 1 am here, and that makes me hungry! I’m thinking about cooking it or finding a restaurant that serve it… maybe sometimes this weekend.

    Mouth watered Dina

  26. That andok jimdak looks super delicious. It’s 1 am here, and that makes me hungry! I’m thinking about cooking it or finding a restaurant that serve it… maybe sometimes this weekend.

    Mouth watered Dina

  27. @Dina………..I hope you find somewhere that serves it. You will definitely enjoy it.

  28. @Dina………..I hope you find somewhere that serves it. You will definitely enjoy it.

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