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Travel Photo Thursday: Apr. 24/14: UNESCO World Heritage Site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

Posted by on Apr 24, 2014 in Canada, Destinations, Featured, Nova Scotia, Travel Photo Thursday | 16 comments

Welcome to the 174th week of Travel Photo Thursday. It’s midterm week, and that means that the semester is officially half over. I’m always amazed at how time flies. This week I’m taking you back to Nova Scotia for a virtual tour of  historical Grand Pre.

 

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hash tag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

As a courtesy please post a link to Budget Travelers Sandbox.

 

In 2012 Nova Scotians were thrilled to learn that the historic village of Grand Pre had been awarded a World UNESCO designation. Less than a two hour drive from Halifax, it’s a perfect day trip. I visited in 2012 and again 2013. Enjoy the photo essay I created from those two visits.

 

We began our visit at the modern interpretive center, which provides visitors with a detailed history of the Acadians and their 1755 expulsion.

 

UNESCO Site : Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

 

UNESCO Site : Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

 

Inside you will learn the history of the Acadians and why they were ultimately expelled from Acadie; later to become Nova Scotia. 

The Acadians ended up in many of the New England States, and as far away as Louisiana. 

 

UNESCO site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

 Acadian farmer at work. The Acadian farms were built on dykes, and you’ll also learn all about how these dykes were constructed.

 

UNESCO site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

The  Great Expulsion, or  Le Grande Derangement began on August 11th, 1755. 

 

UNESCO Site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

Be sure to watch the 20 minute film before leaving the visitor’s center. The movie is an historically accurate 3D portrayal of why the Acadians were expelled, and the dramatic events leading up to their expulsion not only from Nova Scotia, but Canada. 

The Coles Note version of why the Acadians were expelled is that although they signed an oath of allegiance to the British Crown in 1730, they refused to fight pick up arms against the French, or the native Indians. By 1755 this refusal to bear arms was no longer acceptable to the British, and the expulsion began. Between 1755 and 1763, more than 10,000 Acadians were deported. Here’s a detailed history and timeline.

 

A short walk from the visitors center brings you to the statue of Evangaline and the memorial church. Along the way you’ll pass these bronze sculptures titled “Deportation”.

 

UNESCO site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

Most of this history was “forgotten” until Henry Longsworth Longfellow published his epic poem “Evangeline: A Tale of Acadie”, in 1847. The poem is a story of the expulsion of the Acadians from Acadie, and is one of loss and devotion. The poem sealed Longfellow’s fate as the most famous writer in America. Set primarily in Nova Scotia, and Louisiana the poem has had a significant cultural impact on these regions.  You can read Evangeline in its entirety

 

The world famous statue of  Longfellow’s Evangaline…

 

UNESCO Site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

The Memorial Church of Grand Pre is a tribute to the men who were held prisoner while they waited for the deportation ships to arrive. 

 

UNESCO Site: Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

Beautiful stained glass in the church…

 

Stained Glass Window, Chapel, Grand-Pré, Nova ScotiaPhoto Credit: Charles Hoffman via Flickr.com

 

Dykes were built to hold back the waters of the Minas Basin, and these farms  are still in operation today. You can watch the men working using traditional methods from long ago. Somehow I don’t think they farm with equipment from the 1700s everyday!

 

Harvesting the Hay in Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

Dyked Farm Land at Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

Acadian Day celebrations 2013…

 

Acadian Day Celebrations, 2013 -- Grand Pre, Nova Scotia

 

I had no idea that the Acadian Day celebrations were happening on the day that I visited in 2013. I was able to score a delicious lunch of traditional
Rappie Pie (or Rapure). In French, “rapure” means grated, and the main ingredient is grated potatoes. If you ever have the opportunity to try this pie, don’t miss out. It really is fabulous. I was able to buy a half portion for about three bucks!

 

Rappie Pie (Grand Pre, Nova Scotia)

 

 

If you want to try your hand at making rappie pie, check this out

 

Travelers Tip

Hours of operation for the 2014 season…

May 16th - June 28th

Tuesday – Saturday: 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday and Monday: closed
* Exception : Sunday May 18th and Monday May 19th

June 29th - September 2nd

Open daily: 9 pm - 5 pm

September 3rd - October 13th

Tuesday – Saturday: 9 am – 5 pm
Sunday and Monday: closed
* Exception : Sunday October 12th and Monday October 13th

Entrance Fees

Daily (May to October)

Adult $ 7.80
Senior $ 6.55
Youth $ 3.90
Family/Group $ 19.60
“Commercial Group, per person $ 6.55
“School Groups, per student $ 2.90
“School Groups, Entry and a Heritage Presentation Special Program, per student $ 3.90

Seasonal (May to October)

Adult $ 19.60
Senior $ 16.60
Youth $ 9.80
Family/Group $ 49.00

 

How to get there

From Halifax take Highway 101 to Exit 10 towards Wolfville. Follow Route 1 in a westerly direction for one kilometer, then turn right (head north) for another kilometer on the Grand-Pré Road. The drive is under 2 hours, and there is great signage.

On site

Give yourself a couple of hours to see everything. There’s lots of free parking right at the Visitor’s Center. It does get busy on the weekend, so you may find yourself in the overflow parking, a short walk down the road.

 

Grand Pre National Historic Site of Canada

 

Have you ever visited Grand Pre? Were you lucky enough to score some delicious rappie pie?

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This is the 174th edition of Travel Photo Thursday. You can browse the archives here.
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Travel Photo Thursday — Apr. 17/14 — Chiang Mai’s Buddhist Culture

Posted by on Apr 17, 2014 in Destinations, Thailand - Chiang Mai, Travel Photo Thursday | 41 comments

Welcome to the 173rd week of Travel Photo Thursday. The semester is half over, and this week I am preparing my 200+ students for their midterm exams next week. I have no idea where the weeks have gone, and I am sure that the rest of the semester will pass in the same whirlwind fashion. This week I’m bringing you back to Chiang Mai and a sampling of the many photos I have taken in and around the city’s numerous Buddhist temples. Did you know that Chiang Mai boasts more than 300 temples?

 

To join in the Travel Photo Thursday fun simply post a photo on your blog.

Return here and place your link in the Mr. Linky at the bottom of this post.

Please post a link to a post featuring a travel photo, not simply a link to your blog.

The Twitter hash tag for Travel Photo Thursday is #TPThursday.

As a courtesy please post a link to Budget Travelers Sandbox.

 

A statue at the base of the stupa at Wat Lok Molee. The white strings you see are used in numerous ceremonies such as holiday prayers and house blessings. The belief is that the strings transfer the blessings to each of  the participants. After the ceremony they will be cut into small pieces, and attached to visitors wrists to bring good luck. 

 

Buddhist Statue at Wat Lok Molee

 

 

Buddhist blessing string waiting to be hung…

 

Buddhist Blessing String

 

 

Buddhist water libation vessels used in blessings…

 

Buddhist Water Libation Vessels

 

 

Monk bowls at Wat Phan Tao…

 

Monk Bowls at Wat Phan Tao

 

Monks praying at Wat Chedi Luang on ordination day…

 

Monks Praying at Wat Chedi Luang

 

 

Temple bell at Wat Phan Tao…

 

Temple Bell at Wat Phan Tao

 

 

Lighting the candles on Macha Bukha Day at Wat Phan Tao…

Macha Bukha Day celebrates the day when 1,250 monks spontaneously came together to pay homage to the historical Buddha. 

 

Lighting the Candles on Macha Bukha Day

 

Preparing to honor the Buddha on Macha Bukha Day at Wat Phan Tao…

 

Makha Bukha Day, Wat Phan Tao

 

 

Travelers Tip 

The monks are very welcoming, and entrance to all of Chiang Mai’s temples is free. However, you will  come across numerous donation boxes throughout the temple complexes. To give or not to give is your choice. Temples are usually open from sunrise. Many close at 6pm. However, some of the bigger temples, like Wat Chedi Luang, usually stay open into the evening. Do dress appropriately. Women should cover their shoulders and knees. Men must wear shirts. Shoes must be removed before entering. 

The date of Macha Bucha day is based on the lunar calendar, usually in January or February. If you want to experience this celebration, be sure to check the date well in advance. 

 

 

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This is the 173rd edition of Travel Photo Thursday. You can browse the archives here.
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You can follow BTS on… Facebook Twitter Linkedin Instagram Foursquare 

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Egyptian Technology for #FriFotos

Posted by on Apr 12, 2014 in Destinations, Egypt, Featured | 14 comments

This weeks #FriFotos theme is technology…

While cars and crazy traffic might be the norm in Cairo, the low tech camel still plays an important role in Egyptian transportation. Of course, the best place to find one would be at  Egypt’s Barqash Camel Market!

Egypt's Barqash Camel Market

The world is still wondering what technology was used in building these ancient wonders in Giza…

Egypt's Great Pyramids in Giza

 

 

Contributing to #FriFotos, and Friday Postcards at Walking on Travels.

 

You can follow BTS on… Facebook Twitter Linkedin Instagram Foursquare 

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